The Role of Religious Involvement in the Context of Increasing Marijuana Use

Because many people become addicted to opioids through trying to manage chronic pain, adults who are more religious could unintentionally put their health at risk by dismissing medical marijuana use in favor of a more traditional pharmaceutical drug that carries a higher risk of abuse and mortality.

Higher State And Local Minimum Wages May Be Hurting Teen Employment

It’s understandable that voters and officials are concerned about low-income workers and their families, but minimum wage increases have costs as well as benefits. One of these costs appears to be lower teenage employment, and most of these cities already have below-average teenage employment rates.

Lessons from the Classroom (Student Edition): Learning About the Voting Rights Restoration for Felons Initiative

For our final project in our Policy Development and Administration class, we were tasked with analyzing a policy. Having recently learned about Florida's Amendment 4, Voting Rights Restoration for Felons from a different group's presentation, we both decided this could be an interesting and suitable topic for our final project. Neither of us expected what …

Big Metro Areas In Florida Keep Getting Bigger

People cluster and cities grow because of what are broadly known as agglomeration economies. Agglomeration economies include things like knowledge spillovers that make workers and firms more productive, as well as the benefits that come from a thicker labor market, such as better employer-employee matches. Agglomeration economies are the forces that pull people together.

When Are States Kicked Out of International Organizations?

Since World War II, international organizations – entities like the African Union, Arab League, Council of Europe and the Commonwealth – have suspended member states ninety-five times. While some intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) suspend states after financial, economic, or military violations, the vast majority of IGO suspensions happen in response to political backsliding – such as human rights violations, coups democratic recession, or flawed elections.

Orchard Pond Parkway Shows Private Path for Addressing Infrastructure Gap

Public-private partnerships may be the solution to road construction and maintenance amidst budget shortages and population growth. The success of Orchard Pond Parkway can serve as a model for increased public-private partnerships within Florida and the rest of the nation.

We Shouldn’t Stop Gentrification, But We Can Make It Less Painful

Change doesn’t always benefit everyone affected by it, and it’s understandable that cities want to help residents who are struggling with the changes caused by the recent urban revival. But change is part of growth, and helping people adapt to redevelopment is a better approach than stifling it.

Teacher Strikes: Why Now?

Will teachers in Oklahoma, Kentucky and Arizona win their battles? It is difficult to say if teachers will get some or any of their demands met. Politicians, however, would be wise to note that there isn’t a groundswell of parents calling for teachers to get back in the classroom – and that, in some cases, parents are joining their kids’ teachers on the proverbial picket line. This suggests that a new kind of Parent-Teacher Organization may be in the works – one that politicians’ may find difficult to ignore.

Immigrants Fitting In: Challenging the All-Or-Nothing View of Acculturation

But when you move half-way around the world to start a new life in a strange foreign land, this process of trying to fit in is called acculturation. Researchers who studied the last great wave of immigrants to America, writing two or three generations ago in the mid-20th century, tended to give an either-or answer to this question. You could be either German or American. You could be either Chinese or American. We often assumed that becoming an American meant giving up on being German or Chinese.

What Does Fixing Social Security Mean?

Fixing Social Security is not rocket science.  There is money available to fix it.  Consider the $1.3 trillion of annual tax expenditures that are made each year.  While some of these benefit low income households, it is estimated that over half benefit higher income households.  Annual expenditures on Social Security are about $946 billion, so taking a knife to tax expenditures that favor the wealthy has promise.