Policy Pub: Generosity in Hurricane Michael’s Wake

Hurricane Michael hit Florida’s Gulf Coast in October of 2018 as a category five hurricane. The storm leveled communities to the West of Tallahassee, damaging homes, displacing residents, crippling some industries, and leaving piles of debris behind. In its wake, I set off to study how civil society – nonprofits, religious organizations, and less organized…

Is Infrastructure the Silver Bullet to Rural Poverty?

We have three key findings: (1) nationally, the construction of the ADHS increased income by 0.4 percent (2) about half of the benefits occur in counties outside of the ARC (3) despite these modest gains, they are not large enough to break the cycle of poverty in Appalachia. Had the ADHS not been built, incomes in Appalachia would be lower than they are today. However, the region is still in decline, so at best the construction of the ADHS only softened the fall.

What’s Driven the Dramatic Technological Change in the US Wind Power Sector?

As the world’s major energy consumer and greenhouse gas emitter, the United States is striving to increase the share of renewable energy in its electricity supply so as to address climate change and energy security concerns. Among all renewable energy sources, wind energy has great potential to provide a significant share of electricity generation. During the last two decades, the United States has experienced tremendous technological change in wind power both in terms of cumulative installed capacity and generation performance of wind farms.  

Neighborhood Groups of Older People Help Build Inclusive Community

A program that started in 2015 in two rural areas in Kerala, southern India, is attempting to build community from the ground up that is inclusive of older people. The so-called Elderly Inclusion Program sees older people as persons who can contribute to the society and economy in countless ways, and not merely as a dependent group in need of services. It promotes community-building as well as the provision of valuable services and benefits. 

Brand USA: Can We Change the Image of the World’s Most Visible Country?

Despite the limitations of Brand USA as a policy and public/private partnership the American brand endures.  A strong brand elicits strong feelings. Given its visibility and superpower status, I would argue that the United States, not Apple, is the world’s most valuable brand.  The future value of the brand rests in the behavior of citizens, policymakers and how these behaviors are perceived by the rest of the world. A quasi-governmental organization pushing social media blasts to potential international visitors can do little to change these perceptions.