DeSantis’ Coronavirus Leadership Reflects the Prudence Florida Needs Overall

This piece first appeared in the Tallahassee Democrat. Six months into America’s COVID-19 crisis and, remarkably, the virus continues to confound experts. Nevertheless, Gov. DeSantis continues to be attacked as if the best approaches are obvious and clear. In fact, DeSantis, like his peers in other states, is being forced to make severe policy trade-offs…

Research Spotlight: The Impacts of President Trump’s Midterm Endorsements

It’s not breaking news that President Trump likes to tweet. In 2018, he used that social media platform to dole out a rapid-fire of endorsements of congressional candidates running in the midterm elections. During that campaign, he gave out 134 endorsements to 45 congressional candidates on Twitter, and endorsed another 35 congressional candidates at 47…

Research Spotlight: Citizen Engagement and Municipal Marketing in the Sunshine State

Florida cities have yet to fully realize the usefulness of marketing as a strategic tool for achieving municipal goals, but the future is promising. Cities realize the necessity of marketing and branding efforts. In the near future we may be bombarded with more branded images as cities continue to experiment with marketing activities. Strategically, cities should use these marketing efforts to keep us engaged as citizens and connected with our local government in order to achieve their own goals.

Ph.D. Spotlight: Elyse Claxton on Feminine Body Ideals in Teen Girl and Women Fashion Magazines and Instagram

Dr. Claxton’s dissertation analyzes whether (and how) Internet Communication Technologies (ICTs) diversify the kinds of images of women in fashion magazines. Media are important agents of socialization. Accordingly, media images reflect as well as inform what characteristics symbolize feminine beauty. In the field of female beauty and fashion magazines in the U.S., visual portrayals of…

COSSPP Faculty Impact on Scholarship: Influence at a Glance

As the spring semester comes to an end, we want to take a moment to celebrate the accomplishments and influence of faculty in the College of Social Sciences and Public Policy. This series of graphs produced by Dr. Jim Elsner offers a glimpse of the amazing work taking place in the College of Social Science…

Five Principles to Improve Your Virtual Work Space after Coronavirus

This piece first appeared in the Tallahassee Democrat. The Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has led to massive, overnight shifts in higher education and in the broader workforce. Millions of students and workers in Florida and throughout the U.S. are now forced into online learning and virtual work.  Unfortunately, remote work and learning carries its own burdens….

Social Science Scholar: Street Art in France

My summer consisted of traveling for my honors thesis, which has come a long way since it’s conception last Spring. Artist Eric Leleu, who lectured at FSU in the Spring, inspired me to study and explore the representation of migrants in art throughout Europe. His work focused on Calais, so I set my sights on…

Galentine’s Day has become a thing – why hasn’t Malentine’s Day?

On Feb. 13, women will celebrate Galentine’s Day, a holiday trumpeting the joys of female friendships. The holiday can trace its origins to a 2010 episode of “Parks and Rec,” in which the main character, Leslie Knope, decides that the day before Valentine’s Day should be an opportunity to celebrate the platonic love among women, ideally with…

Disinformation about School Shootings on Twitter: Why Does It Happen? What Kind of Information is Shared? Does it Matter?

All of this has implications for democracy. While disinformation and polemics may stimulate a broader public conversation about social concerns such as gun violence, the relative incivility of these narratives which included polemics and insults are unlikely to increase users’ tolerance to individuals’ championing opposing perspectives—which is an important precursor to consensus-building . Conversely, fact-based narratives, particularly those discussing May’s mental health, could assist in consensus-building regarding health care in America. Even the personal narratives shared by students may help those holding opposing points of view regarding issues such as gun control better understand one another insofar as these stories can help individuals find areas of unanticipated agreement. Disinformation, in short, is bad for political conversation, political debate and deliberative processes.