Social Science Scholar: Sustainable Fashion

This summer, I did a 9-week long internship with Behno, a sustainable fashion company based in  New York. Behno is a sustainable handbag company that uses ethical practices, sustainable materials, and sleek designs to create their handbags. They have two to three factories in which they produce their handbags and have paired with a non-profit…

Social Science Scholar: Research in South America and in the U.S.

With the support of the Social Science Scholars program I was able to work on several projects. Once summer began, I conducted a preliminary visit to Alban, Colombia to form relationships with community members to conduct an ethnographic research project in the future about the negation and recuperation of Indigenous identities in Colombia. After my…

Policy Pub: Generosity in Hurricane Michael’s Wake

Hurricane Michael hit Florida’s Gulf Coast in October of 2018 as a category five hurricane. The storm leveled communities to the West of Tallahassee, damaging homes, displacing residents, crippling some industries, and leaving piles of debris behind. In its wake, I set off to study how civil society – nonprofits, religious organizations, and less organized…

Student Spotlight: Internship with Patriots Ghana/Cheerful Hearts Foundation

I have had the amazing opportunity to intern with Patriots Ghana/ Cheerful Hearts Foundation on the Child labor and trafficking project. This Non-profit organization is located in the Central region of Ghana to raise awareness to end child labor within the 3 fishing communities in Ghana, called Senya, Fetteh, and Nyanyano. These regions are located…

Student Spotlight: Parliamentary Internship

If you had told me as a Freshman at FSU that I would live in London and work in Parliament, I would have laughed. However, today, I am so proud that I took the initiative to apply for the Internship Program at FSU because it has changed the trajectory of my life in more ways than one.

Black Women Business Owners’ Struggles and Survival Strategies

As entrepreneurship interventions and initiatives consider other ways to assist new business owners, I hope they consider challenges impacting Black women, specifically. Resources like mentoring, networking workshops, and education related to combating racial and gender discrimination for other owners could alleviate certain problems impacting Black women’s experience with business ownership. Providing the tools to be successful in crowdsourcing, participating in pitch competitions, and juggling full-time employment with personal businesses would also aid Black women entrepreneurs.

From the Dean’s Desk: What a Remarkable 2019!

It’s important to note just how fundamental COSSPP is to FSU’s success. As the third largest college on campus (by number of students), displaying the demographic and intellectual diversity that is a signature of the FSU experience, the College of Social Sciences and Public Policy is a key element of this rise up the rankings. Over the course of the calendar year, COSSPP will graduate another 1,700+ students, producing 1 in every 6 degrees granted by FSU. Unlike many programs that cap their enrollments or limit their majors, COSSPP’s programs serve all students, and we are a key part of the parity in university graduation rates regardless of race, gender, and background.

Social Science Scholar: The Effects of Amendment 4

The Social Science Scholars program has given me an opportunity as an undergraduate to release my own survey on a statewide level. As someone whose father recently was given the right to vote because of Amendment 4, having the opportunity to study its impact on the black community further is an enormous privilege. Helping him become more politically active has meant giving him his voice back, and being able to understand how Amendment 4 could empower larger groups of people is an extension of that. Because of the Social Science Scholars program, I have been given the tools to study a complex issue, and study it in a way that will empower my community. If a connection can be found between Amendment 4 and attitudes towards voting, a path for increasing black political participation as a whole can be found.

Disinformation about School Shootings on Twitter: Why Does It Happen? What Kind of Information is Shared? Does it Matter?

All of this has implications for democracy. While disinformation and polemics may stimulate a broader public conversation about social concerns such as gun violence, the relative incivility of these narratives which included polemics and insults are unlikely to increase users’ tolerance to individuals’ championing opposing perspectives—which is an important precursor to consensus-building . Conversely, fact-based narratives, particularly those discussing May’s mental health, could assist in consensus-building regarding health care in America. Even the personal narratives shared by students may help those holding opposing points of view regarding issues such as gun control better understand one another insofar as these stories can help individuals find areas of unanticipated agreement. Disinformation, in short, is bad for political conversation, political debate and deliberative processes.