Florida Needs More Housing but Government Often Gets in the Way

This piece first appeared in the Tallahassee Democrat. Florida is the third most populous state in the country and has no problem attracting new residents: From 2010 to 2016, 114,744 new households moved to Florida each year. Unfortunately, only 57,952 housing units were added each year. This discrepancy — with demand outpacing supply — has pushed …

Flu and Vaccination: Difference by Age and Race

Research has shown that there are also significant differences between racial groups when it comes to receiving vaccinations. Among adults, white adults are immunized at higher rates (45%) than black (37%) or Hispanic (34%) adults. This has significant consequences for those populations, as black and Hispanics have higher rates of influenza-related death than white populations. Since unvaccinated children and adolescents may interact more often with older unvaccinated members of these populations, the chances of spreading influenza or other diseases may dramatically increase. Vaccinating the children and adolescents of these groups may provide a buffer of protection for these adults.

Age, Perceptions of Mattering, and Allostatic Load

The present research adds to a growing base of evidence that suggests positive intimate relationships act as mechanisms that modify biological pathways associated with disease. For instance, social support, a key factor associated with one’s perception of mattering, is associated with regulation of immune function, including inflammation, which is related to a range of chronic conditions including heart disease.

Social Science Chart of the Day: Thanksgiving Air Travel at a Record High

Available at Statista Airlines for America defines Thanksgiving as starting on Friday November 16, 2018 and ending Sunday November 26, 2018. This projection is up 1.6 million travelers from last year. 

Demographic Transitions and the Eclipse of the Family

Demographic Transitions and the Eclipse of the Family Many countries have experienced a demographic transition from high to low birth and death rates. The United States made this transition gradually during the 1800s and 1900s. Japan transited quickly during the mid-1900s. Pakistan is still stuck in the transition today. But about forty years ago, European …

Climate Change in Florida: Research and Realities

That was one of the purposes of the book we contributed to and the reports and peer reviewed articles we’ve published on this topic; to use the best available science, both physical and social sciences, to inform policy makers about the changes in Florida’s climate and give them the information they need to do something about it.

Neighborhood Groups of Older People Help Build Inclusive Community

A program that started in 2015 in two rural areas in Kerala, southern India, is attempting to build community from the ground up that is inclusive of older people. The so-called Elderly Inclusion Program sees older people as persons who can contribute to the society and economy in countless ways, and not merely as a dependent group in need of services. It promotes community-building as well as the provision of valuable services and benefits. 

Big Metro Areas In Florida Keep Getting Bigger

People cluster and cities grow because of what are broadly known as agglomeration economies. Agglomeration economies include things like knowledge spillovers that make workers and firms more productive, as well as the benefits that come from a thicker labor market, such as better employer-employee matches. Agglomeration economies are the forces that pull people together.

Immigrants Fitting In: Challenging the All-Or-Nothing View of Acculturation

But when you move half-way around the world to start a new life in a strange foreign land, this process of trying to fit in is called acculturation. Researchers who studied the last great wave of immigrants to America, writing two or three generations ago in the mid-20th century, tended to give an either-or answer to this question. You could be either German or American. You could be either Chinese or American. We often assumed that becoming an American meant giving up on being German or Chinese.