How to Fix the Nursing Home Crisis, Now and After the Pandemic

This piece first appeared in the Tampa Bay Times. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused tens of thousands of deaths and more than three million infections, with predictions of many more to come. Nursing home residents have been among the most affected by the pandemic. In some states, half or more of all COVID deaths have…

Aging Today: What is Lifelong Learning?

The script for this piece originally aired during WFSU’s Aging Today segment. We tend to think of education as something we do early in life to prepare us for employment, but programs to give educational opportunities to older adults, often referred to as lifelong learning, have a different goal. Rather than taking courses to gain employment credentials,…

Aging Today: Why is Age Discrimination Hard to Prove?

This piece originally aired during WFSU’s Aging Today segment. Age discrimination is illegal, but unfortunately, it’s pervasive and hard to prove. More than 1 in 5 claims of discrimination filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission are based on age, yet just one percent result in a ruling of age discrimination. This low success rate…

Aging Today: Can We Count on Having Social Security in the Future?

This piece originally aired during WFSU’s Aging Today segment. Social Security has been very successful in reducing poverty among older Americans. But the increasing number of recipients raises the specter that the system cannot be sustained. Economists estimate that without changing in financing, the average benefit will decrease 20% by 2030. Surveys report that at…

Social Science Scholar: Florida Department of Health

This summer, I completed an internship with the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) in Tallahassee, Florida, and Sarasota, Florida. The FDOH oversees all matters of public health and is comprised of a state health office in Tallahassee, and 67 local county departments. My internship comprised of serving at the state health office, as well as…

Aging Today: Why Do Women Tend to Outlive Men?

This piece originally aired during WFSU’s Aging Today segment. American women can expect to live to age 81, compared with 76 years of age for men. Evidence of women’s biological advantage is found at the very outset of life, with male mortality in their first year exceeding that of females. But women’s greater longevity also…

Survey Research and the Politics of Old Age Welfare

A recent paper appearing in Theory in Action, co-authored by William R. Earnest and FSU Sociology Professor Irene Padavic and supported by FSU’s Pepper Center on Aging, tackles a flawed proposal from Robert Binstock about minimizing intergeneration conflict over elderly benefits and uses it to analyze how assumptions grounded in interest group liberalism inform current…

Parental Status and Biological Functioning: Findings from the Nashville Stress and Health Study

Our study should not be interpreted as suggesting the solution to the health risks of parenting is to avoid having children altogether. Rather, we believe the current findings signal a need for an increased attentiveness to the health risks of childrearing, particularly for parents with multiple children in the home. We hope the information provided here can inform parents and their healthcare providers of the potential health risks associated with parenting.

Wealth Flows and Population Aging

So what exactly causes the flow of wealth to reverse? Children have not somehow suddenly become expensive, unproductive creatures. What has changed is that their parents have lost control over that productivity. Contemporary market economies have systematically dismantled all legal and customary direct obligations that children once had towards their parents, a dismantling that is still going on in some parts of the world.