Honors Thesis Spotlight: Cultural Capital, Social Capital, and Horizontal Stratification among University

Relative inequality (average disproportion of income) can either be reduced or extended by the abundance of cultural and social capital. Cultural capital comes from one’s knowledge and academic credential, while social capital is obtained through the connections one has (e.g. clubs or social networks). Previous research has concentrated on how social and cultural capital functions…

Research Quick Take: A case study on the adoption of city management mobile apps for smart urban governance

Tallahassee is a national leader among mid-size cities in e-governance. With a young and well-educated population and a digitally progressive government, the city has made successful investments in information communication technology. Tang et al. (2021) view Tallahassee’s city management app, DigiTally, with its 6,000 regular monthly users, as a best-case scenario for a smart city…

Honors Thesis Spotlight: Investigating Humeral Retroversion in Archaic Populations

Based on prior research, the standard degree of humeral retroversion (the rotation of the head relative to the distal articulation) has been agreed to be between 25°- 35°, and increased retroversion is potentially correlated with several factors. Madison Hubbart’s research evaluates retroversion angles among adult male and female humeri from the Windover population to test…

Research Spotlight: How Burdensome Experiences with College Financial Aid Impact Civic Participation and Trust in Government

Key Questions Bureaucratic rules that impose undue burden on citizens often result in marginalized citizens losing access to rights and benefits. In this project, we explore whether citizens have lower trust in government and civic engagement after losing access to a tuition-free college program. How do experiences of administrative burden influence beliefs about civic duty,…