When men and women working long hours is the norm, women’s careers stall

This piece first appeared on LSE Business Review. Women remain remarkably underrepresented in the partner ranks in professional service firms—as lawyers, accountants, and consultants—despite having gained parity with men at the associate level long ago. This stalled advancement is surprising in light of companies’ efforts to improve the situation, often by means of well- intentioned…

New Abortion Laws Contribute to Sexist Environments that Harm Everyone’s Health

This piece first appeared in The Conversation. Nine states have passed laws in 2019 alone that restrict abortion at the earliest stages of pregnancy. Those of us who study public health are becoming increasingly concerned about the potential for negative health consequences of these kinds of policies on women. That’s because research has shown that laws limiting reproductive rights and services…

Women’s Stalled Advancement: A Work-Family or a Work-Hours Problem

Solutions require a reconsideration of the demand for a long-hours work culture that impedes the ability of both genders to combine home and work—although it is women who pay higher workplace costs. Such a reconsideration is possible. As individual families and employees push back against overwork, they lay the groundwork for others to follow, and the demand for change swells. At the same time, as more research shows the business advantage of reasonable work hours, some employers have come to question the wisdom of grueling work hours. If and when these forces gain traction, neither women nor men will feel the need to sacrifice the home or the work domain, and women might begin to gain workplace equality with men.