When men and women working long hours is the norm, women’s careers stall

This piece first appeared on LSE Business Review. Women remain remarkably underrepresented in the partner ranks in professional service firms—as lawyers, accountants, and consultants—despite having gained parity with men at the associate level long ago. This stalled advancement is surprising in light of companies’ efforts to improve the situation, often by means of well- intentioned…

Women’s Stalled Advancement: A Work-Family or a Work-Hours Problem

Solutions require a reconsideration of the demand for a long-hours work culture that impedes the ability of both genders to combine home and work—although it is women who pay higher workplace costs. Such a reconsideration is possible. As individual families and employees push back against overwork, they lay the groundwork for others to follow, and the demand for change swells. At the same time, as more research shows the business advantage of reasonable work hours, some employers have come to question the wisdom of grueling work hours. If and when these forces gain traction, neither women nor men will feel the need to sacrifice the home or the work domain, and women might begin to gain workplace equality with men.

New Tools And Attitudes For Managing The Millennial Workforce

Our experiences at the DeVoe Moore Center have shown that the Millennial and Gen Z generations are an untapped resource of entrepreneurship and creativity waiting to be shaped by the right organizational leadership and structures. We are inspired and thriving because our Center happens to be located at the sweet spot in transition generations from students to professionals. By making the human resources shift to take advantage of an innate passion for achievement by enabling guided, bottom up, and goal directed effort, our younger works have leverage the experience and skills of more experienced staff to achieve significant growth in productivity and output.